What materials can be welded by ultrasonic metal welders?

Aluminum, brass, copper, most of the precious metals, and nickel alloys can be easily welded. Ultrasonic welding also has the advantage of being able to weld many dissimilar metal combinations.

What are the advantages of ultrasonic metal welding over crimping?

Ultrasonic wire welding is superior for several reasons.  The ultrasonic method does not require the use of any extra materials.  It can join wire to wire or wire to terminals withoutfillers or crimping tools.  Crimped wires, on the other hand, can sometimes loosen and come apart over a period of time.

How large a wire bundle can the ultrasonic wire splicer handle?

We usually recommend a maximum bundle size of 30 sq. mm for bare stranded copper and less for tinned wire.  For our 2500-watt wire welder, we have welded bundles of up to 35 sq. mm. with a single pulse and 48 sq. mm. with two hits.

Can I use the same machine for wire splicing and pin or lug attaching?

You can if you change the tooling.  However, we generally recommend that the SpliceRiteTM be used for wire-to-wire splicing and the SonoWeld® 1600 spot welder be used for wire-to-terminal applications.

How long can the tip be used, on average?

The heat-treated tool steel tip can usually be used for up to 100,000 welds before the tips need replacement.

What are the differences between wedge reed and lateral drive welding methods?

Sonobond uses the wedge reed system in which the transducer/horn drives a rod or reed. The rod (reed) contains a tapered cavity into which the tip is inserted. As a result, the force of the cylinder is directly above the weld spot and the tip is easily replaceable.

On the other hand, the lateral drive method uses a transducer/horn with a small extension to contact the piece being welded. The force of the cylinder is offset, rather than above the weld spot.  The whole horn must be replaced when the tip extension becomes worn, sometimes requiring a recalibration of the system.